The Key to Mental Well Being During Job Search

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The Key to Mental Well Being During Job Search
Focus on the positive
Job Search Wisely
Affirm your value
Be strategic
Greet each new day with optimism
About the author
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The Key to Mental Well Being During Job Search
By Carrie Kruger -  Job Search Specialist at Jobfully

A new poll shows long term unemployment leads to worry, sadness, anger and stress. The Gallup poll reveals that levels of all four go up as a job search lengthens and depression strikes more than a quarter of those out of work for longer than 11 weeks, nearly double the rate of depression for all adults.

None of this is a big surprise. If you are deep into a job search, chances are you’ve experienced worry, sadness, anger or stress.  But the poll revealed one key thing that makes all the difference in mental well being during job search: HOPE.   Job searchers who reported feeling hopeful had far more manageable levels of the other feelings, and less depression overall.

How to you hang on to hope in the midst of heavy competition, rejection and economic stress?

Here are five ways...


Focus on the positive

Avoid negative news reports about the economy.  Surround yourself with people who are supportive and upbeat. Read success stories about people who have beaten unemployment and gotten back to work. Affirm that you have what it takes to be a success story too!


 

Job Search Wisely

Networking is the best way to get a job. Sending out a lot of resumes without inside connections is non-productive and can only add to frustration. The Gallup survey showed negative feelings increased as job seekers applied for more jobs. Focus on networking and using your network wisely. You will end up sending out less resumes, but getting more interviews and job offers.


Affirm your value

Rejection can cause loss of self esteem for some job seekers. That lack of confidence, in turn, hurts future networking and interviewing. So it’s vital to remind yourself that you have valuable skills and much to offer future employers. Go over past successes regularly so they are top of mind. As you interview, use those past successes as evidence of what you are capable of. Learn and grow through rejection but do not let it shake your confidence.


 

Be strategic

Without a strategy, your job search quickly becomes random. You focus on a new job opening and if that doesn’t work out, you are back to square one. With a strategy, you are pursuing multiple channels and leads simultaneously. Setbacks happen in the context of a larger plan and continuous progress.  There is always something new to work on and feel optimistic about.  For help forming a job search strategy, read “Creating a Job Search Strategy”.


 

Greet each new day with optimism

Have a plan for what you will accomplish and confidence you are making progress.  Banish bitterness. Replace it with a great attitude, thankfulness and strategic action toward your goal.

More on hanging on to hope and optimism during a job search:
•    Self Care During a Job Search
•    Dealing with Depression During Job Search
•    Keeping a Positive Mind During Your Job Search


Carrie Kruger -  Job Search Specialist at Jobfully

With deep experience in writing and sharing information, and a passion for helping others toward career and job success, Carrie Krueger came to Jobfully as the Vice President of Content. Her goal is to bring relevant, useful and inspiring information and tools to job seekers, helping them on the journey to great opportunities.

Carrie's background is in journalism. She has a Master's Degree from the University of Oregon and started her career as a television news producer and executive producer. Later she launched and helped run ABCNEWS.com. Carrie had a leadership role in creating a website devoted to parenting and family life. She has also worked in online learning at Apex Learning, and in consumer content at Expedia.

In each of these roles, she looked for ways to convey helpful, relevant information to viewers, readers and users. But, Carrie says her most satisfying experiences have been as a career coach and transition counselor for those looking for new and rewarding work or seeking to grow in current jobs. Carrie brings the desire to connect people to the right jobs to Jobfully where she is working to create valuable curriculum, content and tools to help job seekers take steps to success.

Carrie has a special interest in international adoption and single parent adoption and is a published author on both topics. In her spare time she enjoys the outdoors and travel with her three children and big dog.